Robert Morris

May 252017
 

From left, the Rev. C.S. Gordon, state Sen. Troy Carter, Desiree Charbonnet, and WDSU anchor Norman Robinson. (photo submitted by Charbonnet campaign)

Danae Columbus

Danae Columbus, opinion columnist

It was no coincidence that Dr. C.S. Gordon Jr. gave the invocation at mayoral candidate Desiree Charbonnet’s announcement Monday evening. As one of the state’s most powerful African-American ministers and pastor of Central City’s 96-year-old New Zion Missionary Baptist Church, Gordon and his fellow pastors throughout New Orleans are primed to play a pivotal role in this year’s race for mayor. Continue reading »

May 242017
 

Dakota Banks (via NOPD)

A woman reported she was robbed at gunpoint on Belfast Street and a man was robbed by an intruder at his front door Tuesday night on Colapissa, while officers arrested three suspects allegedly involved in the robbery of a cyclist on Broadway Street on Tuesday morning. Continue reading »

May 232017
 

Desiree Charbonnet announces her candidacy for mayor to a cheering crowd Monday night at the Sheraton Hotel in New Orleans. (photo by Bernie Saul, courtesy of the Charbonnet campaign)


Fulfilling the expectations raised when she recently resigned her seat as judge on the New Orleans Municipal Court, Desiree Charbonnet publicly announced her intent to run for mayor Monday night to supporters gathered at a downtown hotel. Continue reading »

May 192017
 

After protests over the election of Donald J. Trump as President on Wednesday evening, a city employee begins pressure washing a “Black Power” slogan from the Robert E. Lee monument in New Orleans on Thursday morning. (Robert Morris, UptownMessenger.com)

A monument supporter waves a flag with the Confederate battle emblem at the site of the Jefferson Davis monument in early May. (photo by S.L. Alexander for UptownMessenger.com)

By S.L. Alexander

We recently marked the 47th annual New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, and although I’ve never skipped a year, I must admit I no longer have the stamina for more than one day’s attendance. But the weather this day (after two of the fest days being filled with thunderstorms) was unbelievably perfect–60s and 70s, gentle BabyCakes–er, zephyrs (it’s only the local baseball team has morphed names).

The 12 music stages included many types of music — jazz, Cajun, Dixieland, gospel, some country, some folk, a bit of rock — but the predominant genre, this being, after all, a New Orleans heritage festival, was the outgrowth of what is now called rhythm and blues, but back in the day even in New Orleans was referred to on the radio as “race music.” Walking back to the car at the end of the day, I noted with a chuckle the scores of bicycles chained to the fence underneath a sign clearly ordering NO BIKE PARKING, and I was feeling very happy and mellow when we got into the car parked on Jeff Davis Parkway. Heading back toward Uptown, my pleasant musings were abruptly interrupted by the sight of about a dozen protesters with giant Confederate flags, across the street from the Jefferson Davis monument, which was protected by a temporary chain link fence and eight NOPD squad cars filled with armed cops. My spirits plunged. I’ve been here nearly three decades, and the only Confederate flags I’ve ever seen in New Orleans before were at the Civil War (nee the Confederate) Museum. Continue reading »

May 182017
 

The Lycée Français de la Nouvelle Orléans campus on Patton Street.

The Lycée Français de la Nouvelle-Orléans charter school is still working out the details on the lease renewal for its Patton Street campus, preparing to move into the newly renovated Johnson building and deciding how to handle its space in a church on South Carrollton after a prospective tenant pulled out. Continue reading »