Smoked meat and ceviche? It makes sense at Los Crudos Seafood & BBQ

While New Orleans isn’t necessarily known as a barbecue town, Chef Mike Shaffer is hoping to help change that. Shaffer brings his own style to the New Orleans barbecue scene with Los Crudos Seafood & BBQ,  a pop-up that frequents local bars and breweries. 

Shaffer is from Southern California and spent six years working in Chicago restaurants. When the Chicago winters got too cold, he relocated to New Orleans and worked at Lilette and Marjie’s Grill before striking out on his own. With Los Crudos, Shaffer brings the Mexican influences of Southern California to his menu, serving a different kind of barbecue. “I picked up some influences from just from eating at friends’ houses and their parents cooking for me,” he said.

The Marsh hotel in Milan area invites neighbors to enjoy coffee, cocktails

A new boutique hotel, The Marsh, in the Milan neighborhood promises to be a destination for locals and visitors alike. The Marsh is located in the space on Delachaise and Dryades Street that housed the Gladstone Hotel and Restaurant. In 2020, the building was purchased by local developer Matt Rosendahl and completely renovated. 

 Rosendahl went to work adding new windows and refurnishing the space as a combination hotel and lounge. Special touches such as repurposed wood salvaged after Hurricane Ida add a cozy feel that lets you know that you’re staying at a hotel that’s proudly New Orleans. Located a few blocks from St.

Miss Shirley’s on Magazine keeps the spirit of a neighborhood Chinese restaurant

A new Chinese restaurant on Magazine Street has a familiar family at its helm. Miss Shirley’s opened on Dec. 1 in the space that was occupied by Jung’s Golden Dragon II. Jung’s Golden Dragon, which opened in Metairie in 1977 before relocating Uptown in 2010, closed in May when the owner, Jung Tan, retired. Miss Shirley’s is named for co-owner and hostess Shirley Lee.

TNOLA Languages Offers Translators & Interpreters: 5 Reasons Your Org Should Provide These Services On Request (sponsored)

We believe quality interpretation and translation require a personalized approach and that is exactly what we offer. TNOLA Languages offers in-person language services in New Orleans, where it is headquartered, and in Houston, as well as remote language services across the country. Its professional translators (for writing) and interpreters (for speech) can help your organization provide these services when a customer or client requests them. Read on to learn why you should provide language services upon request. 1.

New Chick-fil-A at I-10 & Carrollton is open and ready for business (sponsored)

Franchised owner/operator Ben McLeish has deep roots in New Orleans, having lived in the city for more than 20 years, founding a nonprofit organization and leading an inner-city ministry. He has a deep passion for the city his family calls home and plans for his new restaurant to inspire a generation of leaders. Locally owned and operated

As full-time, hands-on leaders in their restaurants and communities, Chick-fil-A owner/operators proudly reside in the communities they serve. For McLeish, caring for neighbors in New Orleans has motivated him throughout his career. When he first moved to the city from his home state of Georgia, his desire to help those in need led him to nonprofit work, where he met his wife, Stephanie.

Hobby Lobby buys historic church on Magazine with plans to lease it to local congregation

Hobby Lobby Stores, a national craft-supply retail chain, has purchased the former Valence Street Baptist Church, a historic property on Magazine Street, records show. The NOLA Baptist Church, a fledgling Uptown congregation, plans to lease it from Hobby Lobby, the church’s pastor, the Rev. Kyle Jagers, confirmed on Monday (Dec. 5). “We have entered into a lease with them as the tenant,” Jagers said. “As the tenant, we will begin work to restore the property to its historic value and appearance.

Nomiya ramen shop expands with move to new Magazine Street spot

Nomiya, the ramen shop serving the Japanese comfort food since 2017, has moved three blocks up Magazine Street to a spot that allows room for expansion. Sunday (Nov. 27) was Nomiya’s first day in the building formerly occupied by Del Fuego, a Mexican restaurant that had operated in the space since 2014. Del Fuego closed during the summer. Nomiya is owned by Hidetoshi “Elvis” Suzuki, former owner and chef of Kanno sushi bar, and brother and sister team Allen and Christie Nguyen.

Piety and Desire on Magazine is a haven for chocolate devotees

Piety and Desire Chocolate, a haven for chocolate lovers, can now be found on Magazine Street. 

Owner Christopher Nobles, a New Orleans native, discovered chocolate-making eight years ago. He opened a small retail store in 2017 on South Broad Street near Washington Avenue, in the same building where his chocolate is manufactured. 

While the Broadmoor shop closed during the pandemic, Piety and Desire Chocolate continued to sell and ship its decadent treats. The Piety and Desire chocolate factory remains on South Broad. 

Piety and Desire Chocolate is manufactured from ethically traded cocoa beans, and whole chocolate bars are labeled with the names of where their cocoa beans were grown, including Peru, St. Lucia and Vietnam. The café on Magazine Street opened in April.

Bakery Bar’s new chef adds a Latin touch to the menu

The Bakery Bar in the Lower Garden District has a new chef, Lydia Solano, who was previously at the helm of Bacchanal’s kitchen. Chef Lydia will be introducing a new menu and, and the Bakery Bar will host a daily brunch. 

Growing up, Solano split her time between the United States and Costa Rica. After graduating from culinary school in Boston, she hitchhiked across the country, dropping into kitchens and learning skills on the job. “I worked everywhere from smokehouses to Japanese sushi spots,” she said. “I learned a broad aspect of cooking by stopping into different places and working where I could.”

Eight years ago, when she first visited New Orleans and began regularly spending time here, she started introducing Creole flavors into her cooking.

Return of Hubig’s Pie causes mad rush to South Carrollton

When word spread on Sunday (Nov. 6) that Hubig’s Pies was back after 10 years, the news was met with shouts of glee, followed by the sounds of locals running down sidewalks and cars racing across parish lines. The day before hitting the store shelves, Hubig’s Pies popped up in a South Carrollton Avenue parking lot. Tires across the city sped across potholes at axle-breaking speeds to reach the limited run of 7,000 pies before they were gone. Locals were racing down South Carrollton to the Hubig’s Pies pop-up at the Whitney Hancock Bank parking lot, as the Oak Street Po-Boy Festival drew crowds a block away. 

Gridlocked drivers shouted to passers-by, “Are there any pies left?”