2019 National Book Award winner Sarah Broom to speak at Tulane

By Barri Bronston, Tulane University

Sarah M. Broom, a New Orleans native and winner of the 2019 National Book Award, will speak Tuesday, Feb. 4, at Tulane University as part of the “American Water and Actual Air” speaker series, which focuses on interpreting the environment across academic disciplines. Sponsored by the Tulane School of Liberal Arts’ Environmental Studies Program, the event will be in conversation format with Vann Newkirk II, a staff writer at The Atlantic. It will take place at 6 p.m. at Stone Auditorium at Woldenberg Art Center, beginning with a reception sponsored by the New Orleans Center for the Gulf South. It is free and open to the public.

City approves Tulane police substation at the former site of a notorious frat house

By Emily Carmichael, Uptown Messenger

Tulane University has won city approval to build a Tulane University Police Department substation on the previous site of the Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity building across from The Boot Bar and Grill. The now vacant lot at 1036 Broadway is zoned as residential and required a conditional use approval to be used in a public works and safety capacity. As Uptown Messenger previously reported, the station will be a single story, 3,600-square-foot building to serve as a 24/7 command center for TUPD’s off-campus patrols. The City Council approved the conditional use by a unanimous vote on Thursday, Jan. 16, following an earlier City Planning Commission recommendation.

LSU championship game boosts Uptown economy

By Christian Willbern, Loyola University New Orleans

As the LSU Tigers paraded down Victory Hill on Saturday, Uptown restaurant and stores still basked in the influx of cash from Monday night’s football game. LSU’s national championship win against Clemson gave a boost to the local economy, especially to businesses that kept the drinks coming. “Keep in mind that all the Baton Rouge kids are all driving down here. We got a 50% increase in sales just on Monday alone,” said Broadway Food Store manager Kal Ghalbatar. “It was crazy.”

“Probably 80% of our customers were not regular customers.

The significance of Newcomb pottery and where to find it on the Tulane campus

In New Orleans during the late 19th and early 20th century, a form of artistic expression emerged. It emphasized improvisation and individual expression, and it gave voice to talented individuals whose voices had traditionally been repressed. It’s not what you may think. As well as jazz music, that description can apply to Newcomb pottery. A permanent display of Newcomb products in the new Commons building on Tulane’s Uptown campus now makes them more accessible to the general public as well as students.

Tampon Tax Protest Tour makes stop at Tulane

To combat the taxing of menstrual products, the national Tampon Tax Protest Tour for menstrual equity will make its New Orleans stop on Tulane University’s campus today (Nov. 22). “Recognizing that taxes on menstrual products are discriminatory and illegal,” organizers said, “New Orleans will be part of a collective action against taxing these products, which, along with diapers, are currently taxed by the State of Louisiana.” The protest is part of a national effort called Tax Free. Period, organized by LOLA, a “lifelong brand for a woman’s body,” and Period Equity, a law and policy organization fighting for menstrual equity.

Xavier will celebrate famed photographer with ‘Picturing Creole New Orleans’

Xavier University of Louisiana, in partnership with The Louisiana Creole Research Association, will celebrate the opening of “Picturing Creole New Orleans: The Photography of Arthur P. Bedou” on Saturday, Oct. 26. The exhibition is part of LA Creole’s 15th annual conference, and it will feature collected photographs by the heralded New Orleans native who was personal photographer to Booker T. Washington. “The purpose of the conference is to showcase Creole life in New Orleans in the early 20th century through the lens of Mr. Bedou,” conference organizers said. Lectures, a panel discussion, presentations, and workshops inspired by Bedou’s legacy will take place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Xavier University’s Convocation Center Annex, 7401 Stroelitz St., Building 62 (at Fern St.).

Tulane researchers partner with United Houma Nation on climate and health resilience study

From Tulane University

The United Houma Nation is a Louisiana state-recognized tribe trying to maintain its unique culture during dramatic climatic, environmental and socioeconomic change. A new project awarded to Tulane University researchers from the School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine aims to enable the United Houma Nation to determine how to support its citizens to adapt to climate-related and other short- and long-term stressors while maintaining the integrity of its community and culture. The three-year, $2.1 million research project was awarded by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine Gulf Research Program’s Thriving Communities Grants 5 funding opportunity. Tribal citizens have sustained livelihoods and communities in southeast Louisiana’s shifting landscape for generations. Today, however, ongoing coastal land loss combined with the cumulative impacts of health, social, and economic disparities pose new challenges for the tribe.

Tulane eyes a new police substation across from The Boot on Broadway

By Sharon Lurye, Uptown Messenger

Students who like to party at The Boot on Saturday nights may have to deal with a new neighbor next year: the cops. The Tulane University Police Department wants to build a new station across from The Boot, a popular student bar at the corner of Zimpel Street and Broadway.  The station would serve as a command center for the department’s off-campus patrols, and would be open 24/7. Before the university can move forward with its plans, it must first ask for approval from the City Planning Commission, as the area is zoned residential. A public hearing is scheduled for Oct. 8 in City Hall.

Tulane celebrates new home for Newcomb Institute, student union in the center of campus

from Tulane University

Tulane University President Mike Fitts will officially welcome students today to the opening of The Commons, the newly completed $55 million, 77,000-square-foot complex in the heart of the university’s Uptown campus. The ceremony will take place at 6:15 p.m. and feature music, giveaways and a special guest performance by an iconic New Orleans group. The Commons will serve as a meeting, studying and gathering place for students, the unified home for the Newcomb Institute and a state-of-the-art dining facility with multiple serving stations, a rotating menu of local and international cuisine and a Chef’s Table demonstration kitchen. The complex combining student life, academics, research and great food is Tulane’s largest construction project since Yulman Stadium, said Fitts, who called it a “transformative space.” “Imagine, the academic and social engagement when you have students and faculty from multiple fields and backgrounds gathering for discussions in an exquisitely designed ultra-modern building with commanding views of the campus,” Fitts said.

Tulane researcher to study trauma intervention in mothers and children

By Barri Bronston, Tulane University

A Tulane University researcher will study the effectiveness of an intervention to address trauma in mothers and their children as part of a four-year grant that will bring the family-focused project to New Orleans area Head Start centers. Under the $500,000 grant from the National Institute of Mental Health, assistant professor of psychology Sarah Gray and her team of graduate students and trainees will implement a program called Mom Power, an existing evidence-based intervention that aims to mitigate the negative impacts of trauma on physical and mental health across generations. Gray, director of the Tulane Child and Family Lab and a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Tulane School of Medicine, said the project builds on the research she has been doing since arriving at Tulane in 2014. “In our work, we’ve seen that mothers’ experiences of early adversity have implications not only for their own physical and mental health, but also for their young children’s,” Gray said. “Existing research, including our own, shows that that the effects of trauma can extend across generations, and also that moms’ mental health and behavior affect their kids, and vice versa,” she said.