Three lions at the Audubon Zoo test positive for Covid-19

From the Audubon Nature Institute

Three African lions at Audubon Zoo tested positive yesterday for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid-19. During the week of Dec. 20, Audubon Zoo animal care staff observed the lions were coughing and producing nasal discharge. Nasal and fecal samples for three symptomatic lions were collected and tested at the Louisiana Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory in Baton Rouge, confirming the presence of SARS-CoV-2 for lions Arnold and Kali and their cub Asani on Dec. 28.

Viewpoint: They all ask’d for the COVID vaccine

 

I’ve been waiting for a savvy organization like the Audubon Zoo to announce plans to vaccinate vulnerable animals against COVID-19. Since the virus might have started in wild animals and was later transmitted to humans, it makes good sense that the zoo’s four-legged residents — and even our family pets — could catch the virus. Mike VII, LSU’s live tiger mascot, is probably the best-known animal in Louisiana to be vaccinated against COVID-19. He got his second dose earlier this week and will again be available for close-up visits later this month.  

Mike’s vaccine was donated by the drug manufacturer Zoetis, which is also providing more than 11,000 vaccine doses for mammalian species residing at the Audubon Zoo and dozens of other conservatories, sanctuaries, zoos and academic institutions around the country. Audubon will use their doses to inoculate at-risk animals including apes, big cats, and such mustelids as ferrets, according to WWL-TV. 

Most of us don’t have an ape or big cat at home to protect, but we do have domestic pets.

Audubon Zoo is recycling strands of holiday lights to aid wildlife

New Orleanians will be dragging their Christmas trees to the curb for coastal restoration after Jan. 6. but what all those strands of lights? Most holiday lights are not bio-degradable — and they are dangerous to animals that can get tangled in the strands. You can make a positive impact on the natural world by recycling your lights and keeping them out of the landfill.

Audubon Zoo mourns the death of baby gorilla

From the Audubon Institute

The Audubon family is devastated by the loss of a critically endangered western lowland gorilla born on Sept. 4. The 6-day-old infant was the first gorilla birth at Audubon Zoo in 24 years and the first offspring for 13-year-old Tumani. Animal care staff noticed on Wednesday evening the gorilla infant seemed lethargic and weak in the arms of the mother. The infant was transferred to the zoo’s animal hospital, but the veterinarian team could not revive the infant.

‘We all mask for you’: Audubon Zoo reopens with restrictions in place

The Audubon Zoo reopened to the public on Wednesday, June 3. Zoo visits, however, are now a little different than in the past. All visitors will follow a one-way trail through almost all of the zoo to see many of their favorite animals and wildlife habitats. The interactive and indoor exhibits remain closed. Due to state and city reopening guidelines, all zoo admissions, including member admission, must be reserved online in advance for a specific date and entry time.

Help the Audubon Zoo name its new lion cubs

With the Audubon Zoo closed to the public, few have been able to meet the newest addition to the zoo’s swelling pride: two male lion cubs. Born in January to mom Kali and dad Arnold, the two cubs are still unnamed. But the zoo keepers are planning to change that, and they are asking for your help. Animal care staff at Audubon Zoo have narrowed their selection of names down to their top three: Haji, Radi and Asani. All the names are Swahili words chosen for their sound and meaning.