Oct 222015
 
Retired Lt. Gen. Russell Honore (center) and other advocates discuss contamination in the soil at the former Booker T. Washington site in front of what remains of the former school in September 2014. (Robert Morris, UptownMessenger.com)

Retired Lt. Gen. Russell Honore (center) and other advocates discuss contamination in the soil at the former Booker T. Washington site in front of what remains of the former school in September 2014. (Robert Morris, UptownMessenger.com)

Ending a plan that was controversial on numerous levels, officials announced this week that Walter L. Cohen school will be rebuilt on its traditional site in the Milan neighborhood, while control of the Booker T. Washington site will be given to the KIPP network once the campus is rebuilt. Continue reading »

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Oct 222015
 

P&P-storefrontnew4Why fight construction and traffic between your home and the Post Office when you can drop by Parcels and Post? We offer a full range of postal options including way cool stamps, International Mail, Priority Mail and Priority Express.

Need a tracking number? We can add tracking to any mail piece to prove you sent the item. Come on in and take a look at our new selection of locally made and local themed gifts, cards, mugs, jewelry, magnets and bumper stickers. Continue reading »

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Oct 222015
 

Allan Katz and Danae Columbus

What has happened to our candidates in Louisiana and the U.S.? In the old days, qualifying for public office was a sacred vow people took (men only for so many years) when they put themselves on the line for the public good.

Unfortunately, in our modern election cycle we have candidates who have no qualms lying about where they live, whether their taxes are properly filed and paid, and what their sexual habits might be. More than a few elected officials also commit crimes while in office and end up in jail. Continue reading »

Oct 222015
 

(map by Uptown Messenger via Google Maps)

(map by Uptown Messenger via Google Maps)

Low water pressure is expected on parts of Chestnut and Felicity streets in the Lower Garden District on Friday for work in the area, the Sewerage and Water Board of New Orleans announced.

The streets that will have low water pressure are Chestnut (from St. Andrew to Felicity and Orange) and Felicity (from Chestnut to St. Charles Avenue). The work will last from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday, Oct. 23, so that fire service to the area can be improved.

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Oct 212015
 
6th Annual NAMI Second Line

(via NAMI New Orleans)

 

The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) is holding a second line in Audubon Park this Saturday, Oct. 24 to raise funds and awareness for mental illness. NAMI will be accepting donations of gently used and new shoes to send to developing nations as well. Continue reading »

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Oct 212015
 
(images via NOPD)

Suspects in the September robbery of the gas station on South Carrollton. (images via NOPD)

Investigators have released photos of two men suspected in an armed robbery in September of a South Carrollton Avenue gas station, and detectives are looking for more surveillance video related to three other armed robberies over the last week. Continue reading »

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Oct 212015
 

The 5th Annual Strike for STEM will be a night of bowling, cocktails, food, and live music by The Benchwarmers. The fundraiser will take place this Saturday, Oct. 24 at Rock n’ Bowl and will benefit Core Element, a non-profit organization promoting quality teaching in STEM–– science, technology, engineering and math–– across the Greater New Orleans area. Continue reading »

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Oct 202015
 
UM-tees

Click for full store. Pre-order by Friday, Oct. 23, for items to be ready by Thursday, Nov. 5, Pop-Up Shop.

NOLA Messenger is proud to be an independent, New Orleans-owned and operated media company that has supplied quality news about the community to the community for five successful years. Now, you can help support our reporting in your neighborhood — and show some love for your favorite neighborhood news site — by purchasing from our new line of merchandise. Continue reading »

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Oct 202015
 
1455 Arabella Street (via City of New Orleans)

1455 Arabella Street (via City of New Orleans)

Plans for the rebuilt house at 1455 Arabella Street. (Rendering by Mayo Architects, via City of New Orleans)

Plans for the rebuilt house at 1455 Arabella Street. (Rendering by Mayo Architects, via City of New Orleans)

A home on Arabella Street was approved Monday to be mostly torn down and then rebuilt, without opposition from neighbors or city officials. Continue reading »

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Oct 202015
 

SWBCamp Street near Jefferson Avenue will close this week through the end of the year as part of the ongoing installation of a drainage canal there, according to the Sewerage & Water Board of New Orleans. Continue reading »

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Oct 202015
 
(image via NOPD)

(image via NOPD)

Investigators have obtained a surveillance photo of two people they want to speak to about an armed robbery last week on Melpomene Street in the Lower Garden District, and are hoping the public can help identify them, New Orleans police said. Continue reading »

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Oct 192015
 
Owen Courrèges

Owen Courrèges

A few weeks ago the animated TV show “South Park” premiered a new episode regarding an issue so close to our hearts here in New Orleans: gentrification.

The plot of the episode revolved around attempts by the fictitious Colorado town for which the series is named to attract a new Whole Foods Market. This, the city reasoned, would prove the backwoods hamlet to be progressive and forward-thinking. Continue reading »

Oct 182015
 
An image from the security videos at Patois. Detectives note that the infrared video changes the colors in the video, and that the turquoise clothing is actually shown as near-black in normal light. (image via NOPD)

An image from the security videos at Patois. Detectives note that the infrared video changes the colors in the video, and that the turquoise clothing is actually shown as near-black in normal light. (image via NOPD)

In the security video that shocked New Orleans, infrared distortion turns the skin of patrons at Patois a bluish-gray color, creating a visual sense of unreality that matches the confusion felt by those diners moments later when three men wearing masks and hoodies burst in, robbing the entire restaurant at gunpoint on Aug. 21. That citywide shock was only amplified in late September, when robberies took place in similar fashion at Cafe Atchafalaya in the Irish Channel and then the Monkey Hill bar, only a few blocks from Patois and Audubon Park.

The Mayor called a news conference to announce an arrest in an unrelated spree of robberies and tout the city’s crimefighting efforts, then another new conference a day later after Monkey Hill, joined by U.S. Attorney Kenneth Polite and pledging federal investigation and prosecution of the cases. Local news outlets “flooded the zone” with reaction and analysis pieces, while The New York Times and Washington Post brought national attention to the robbery spree. By the end of the month, the New Orleans City Council held its own hearing on “high-profile” robberies, pitching questions and suggestions to NOPD officials about how to battle the city’s feeling that control was being lost.

The entire discussion, however, provides ample opportunity for an airing of misconceptions about the city, its long battle with violent crime and its police force. While nearly every side of the discussion — frightened residents, embattled city leaders, besieged police officers, and skeptical critics — have made valid and useful points about the issue, the facts frequently get lost in the rhetoric. Continue reading »