Feb 152019
 

from Loyola University New Orleans

Loyola University New Orleans announces the opening of the “Loyola Center for Counseling and Education (LCCE),” a new sliding-scale counseling clinic offering mental healthcare to underserved members of the New Orleans community. The LCCE is hosted by Loyola University New Orleans’ Department of Counseling.

The clinic is housed at 2020 Calhoun St. in Mercy Hall on Loyola University’s campus and is easily accessible from the surrounding residential area. Continue reading »

Jan 302019
 

Lead author Molly Keogh shot this photo near Bohemia, looking northeast over the marshes of Breton Sound in southeastern Louisiana. (courtesy of Tulane University)

By Barri Bronston, Tulane University

A new Tulane University study questions the reliability of how sea-level rise in low-lying coastal areas such as southern Louisiana is measured and suggests that the current method underestimates the severity of the problem. The research is the focus of a news article published this week in the journal “Science.”

Relative sea-level rise, which is a combination of rising water level and subsiding land, is traditionally measured using tide gauges. But researchers Molly Keogh and Torbjörn Törnqvist argue that in coastal Louisiana, tide gauges tell only a part of the story.

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Jan 092019
 

Avron and Wendy Fogelman

As Tulane men’s basketball team looked to get back on track in search of its first league win of the season, it gained a major win from some former students.

Tulane almuni Avron B. Fogelman (Class of 1962) and Wendy Mimeles Fogelman (Class of 1963) have given $1 million to support Tulane University men’s basketball, the university announced.

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Nov 292018
 

In an unprecedented accomplishment for the university, six Xavier University of Louisiana students received awards at the 2018 Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students (ABRCMS) for their innovative research in the Science, Technology, and Engineering and Mathematic (STEM) fields.

Students presented their research to a panel of experts in such areas as chemistry, biology, neuroscience, psychology, and physiology at the conference in November. Continue reading »

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Nov 262018
 

Loyola University New Orleans returns from the Thanksgiving holiday today under a groundbreaking new president. The Jesuit university made history this month with the Nov. 16 inauguration of Tania Tetlow as the university’s 17th president. She is the first woman and the first layperson to lead Loyola since the university’s founding in 1912.

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Nov 122018
 

A photo of Jennifer Thompson in college in the 1980s and Ronald Cotton in the booking photos she was shown after her rape. (via http://www.pickingcottonbook.com)

In 1984, a man broke into to college student Jennifer Thompson’s apartment while she was sleeping and raped her in her bed, but she did her utmost through the assault to scrutinize every aspect of his appearance so she could give police as complete a description as possible. She helped create a composite sketch that swiftly led to an arrest, and her testimony sent Ronald Cotton to prison for both her rape and another woman’s for two life sentences.

Ten years later, DNA evidence proved that Cotton was not, in fact, Thompson’s attacker, and that the actual rapist was a similar-looking man Cotton had been blaming throughout the appeals process. While Cotton sat in prison, that man committed dozens of other violent crimes, including six rapes — leading Thompson to the horrifying realization that her mistaken identification not only sent an innocent man to jail, but also allowed a rapist to walk the streets free.

“If we’re going to talk about wrongful conviction, we also have to talk about wrongful liberty,” Thompson said. “…Everybody gets hurt. Everybody is failed — everybody except the perpetrator, who lives to be free.” Continue reading »

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Nov 092018
 

Robert Jones, who, in 2017, was exonerated of four different crimes from the 1990s, speaks to the audience at “Protecting the Innocent: Louisiana’s Reform of Eyewitness Identifications” at Loyola University New Orleans’ Law School on Friday, November 11. Jones was exonerated with the help of the Innocence Project of New Orleans. (Zach Brien, UptownMessenger.com)

Accurate descriptions of suspects have proven to be extremely difficult to come by, even under the best of circumstances, a noted criminologist said Friday morning during the 2018 Loyola Law Review Symposium, “Protecting the Innocent: Louisiana’s Reform of Eyewitness Identifications.”

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Nov 012018
 

From Tulane University:
Can cleaning vacant lots cause a chain of events that curbs child abuse or stops a teen from falling victim to violence?

Katherine Theall of Tulane University's School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine is the principal investigator in the study of blight and violence. (Photo by Paula Burch-Celentano via Tulane University)

Katherine Theall of Tulane University’s School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine is the principal investigator in the study of blight and violence. (Photo by Paula Burch-Celentano via Tulane University)

That’s the provocative question behind a new Tulane University research project to study whether maintaining vacant lots and fixing up blighted properties in high-crime areas reduces incidents of youth and family violence. The National Institutes of Health awarded Tulane a $2.3 million grant to test the theory in New Orleans.

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Sep 142018
 


Dr. Oliver Sartor, center, medical director of the Tulane Cancer Center, holds a sign at the start of the 2017 NOLA Bluedoo run with former New Orleans Saints linebacker and NFL Hall-of-Famer Rickey Jackson, left, and A.P. Sanchez, president of the Zulu Social Aid and Pleasure Club. (submitted photo)

One thousand runners are expected to dash across the Tulane Uptown campus on Saturday evening as part of the Fifth Annual Blue Doo Run, a fundraiser for prostate cancer research. Continue reading »

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May 302018
 

A Message from Incoming President Tania Tetlow to Alumni, Donors and Volunteers from Loyola University on Vimeo.

Tania Tetlow, recently named as the 17th president of Loyola University New Orleans and the first layperson to serve in that role, recorded a series of greeting videos in which she introduces herself to students, faculty, parents, alumni and university donors. In the videos, Tetlow describes her life growing up around the university in a family of Jesuit priests, even being “sung to sleep with Gregorian chant,” and promising to work with all the groups to improve the university in the fall.

Her message to alumni is above. To see all the videos, see Loyola University’s page at Vimeo.

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Apr 272018
 

Jesmyn Ward listens as interviewer Nathaniel Rich poses a question during a reading at Garden District Books in October. (Robert Morris, UptownMessenger.com)

Novelist Jesmyn Ward — whose accolades include frequent comparisons to fellow Mississippian William Faulkner — will give this year’s commencement address to students at Tulane University, where she is a professor of English. Continue reading »

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Apr 262018
 

The limited engagement of ECLIPSED—award-winning play by Danai Gurira (Black Panther)—continues its run at Loyola University through Sunday, May 6. The black female-led production about five women during the Second Liberian Civil War is part of Southern Rep Theatre’s 2017-18 season in residence at Loyola’s Department of Theatre Arts and Dance.

Idella Johnson (L) & LaSharron Purvis performing ECLIPSE. (photo by John B. Barrios)

ECLIPSED is described as “a delicately drawn portrait of the captive wives of a rebel officer in Liberia in 2003. Each one works to find her own way to survive and her place within their tenuous community as the war draws to a close and an uncertain future awaits them. Gurira’s play celebrates their strength, resourcefulness, and humor within an unflinching examination of the human toll of the conflict.” Continue reading »

Apr 162018
 

(map via NOPD)

A Tulane student and her friend were forced to participate in sex acts with a group of a half-dozen men at a home on South Claiborne Avenue early Sunday, prompting an aggravated rape investigation by the New Orleans Police Department, authorities said. Continue reading »

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Apr 052018
 

Three former mayors of New Orleans — Moon Landrieu, Sidney Barthelemy and Marc Morial — will join current Mayor Mitch Landrieu and Mayor-elect LaToya Cantrell tonight in a discussion on the city’s past and future as part of the Loyola Institute of Politics’ annual lecture series. Continue reading »