Apr 032020
 

From left, Liz Mahoney, Gale Froeba, Quyen La and Mike Kravet are members of the Tulane Medical Center team responsible for operating the Roche Cobas 6800 analyzer used to run COVID-19 diagnostic tests. (Photo courtesy of Tulane Medical Center)

By Barri Bronston, Tulane University

A laboratory based at Tulane Medical Center and in partnership with UMC-LCMC is conducting a new test for COVID-19 that can yield results within four hours. The test was made possible through the joint efforts of the Tulane University School of Medicine, the LSU School of Medicine, Tulane Medical Center, LCMC Health and Roche Diagnostics.

Researchers at the Tulane Medical Center Laboratory ran its first set of tests using the Cobas 6800 analyzer over the weekend and is now capable of running nearly 200 tests a day. The testing is open only to patients at Tulane Medical Center and University Medical Center. Continue reading »

Mar 312020
 

By Christian Willbern, guest columnist

Christian Willbern, guest columnist

In a few weeks, I was supposed to get up at 7 a.m., put on a starchy cap and gown, and walk across a stage in front of hundreds of people to receive an empty diploma sleeve.

While that sounds more revolting than Burger King’s 2002 green ketchup, I was inexplicably looking forward to it. Many of my fellow seniors were.

That walk across a stage was earned through four (in my case, five) years of hard work and panic attacks — just to be taken away within a blink of an eye.

Continue reading »

Mar 162020
 

(via tulane.edu)

By Julia Prager-Hessel, guest columnist

Students, faculty, and staff at Tulane received an email last Wednesday that said classes will cease or go online, and those living on campus are to leave in the next week and a half.

However fracturing to our semesters, this move came as no surprise and with little resentment from students. Tulane is largely a flight school that draws many of its students from Los Angeles, New York and Chicago, and our friends at schools across the country had been sent home throughout the week. Continue reading »

Mar 122020
 

Chart from “Do Charter Schools Keep Their Best Teachers and Improve Quality?” by Nathan Barrett, Deven Carlson, Douglas N. Harris, Jane Arnold Lincove, Research on Education Access and Choice

From the National Center for Research on Education Access and Choice

A new study from an education research center based at Tulane University finds that New Orleans’ all-charter school system succeeds in removing low-performing teachers, but it struggles to replace them with high-performing ones.

The study by National Center for Research on Education Access and Choice, or REACH, cuts to the heart of the debate over whether market-based school reforms help improve teacher quality. In New Orleans, all schools are charters with great freedom to hire and fire teachers. Schools also compete with one another for talent and are under intense pressure to raise student test scores. Continue reading »

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Mar 122020
 

Loyola University moves to online classes beginning Monday and has canceled on-campus classes for the rest of this week. (photo via loyono.edu)

Two Loyola University students and a faculty member went into a 14-day self-quarantine on March 10, at the request of the university, after attending a journalism conference and having lunch at a downtown restaurant with an individual who was later diagnosed with COVID-19 novel coronavirus.

The students and professor have not displayed any symptoms, Loyola President Tania Tetlow said in a March 11 letter to the Loyola community announcing that all classes will taught online for the rest of the spring semester beginning Monday (March 16). Continue reading »

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Mar 122020
 

The New Orleans Book Festival at Tulane University has canceled its inaugural event for 2020, citing concerns over the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

From Tulane University

The New Orleans Book Festival at Tulane University has canceled its inaugural event for 2020, citing concerns over the coronavirus pandemic and adherence to university protocol.

Tickets purchased for keynote addresses with John Grisham, Michael Lewis and Malcolm Gladwell will be fully refunded within 10 business days. Continue reading »

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Mar 072020
 

The newly released “Recipes and Remembrances of Fair Dillard, 1869-2019” tells the culinary history of Dillard University through notes and recipes from celebrities, civil rights activists, Dillard alumni, and more. (Camille Barnett, GentillyMessenger.com)

Food historian, educator, and author Zella Palmer will present her recently published “Recipes and Remembrances of Fair Dillard, 1869-2019” this Sunday, March 8. Using recipes and research, Palmer’s book documents the African American culinary history of New Orleans through the lens of Dillard University. She will be signing copies of her work for 2 p.m. at Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St. Continue reading »

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Mar 052020
 

Esperanza Milla, India Miller, Allan Buezo and Kayla Red were awarded full scholarships.

Four Lusher Charter School seniors have been named Posse Scholars, an honor that provides them with full-tuition college scholarships. Continue reading »

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Feb 112020
 

The daily lineups of the New Orleans Book Festival at Tulane University will feature over 100 celebrated and rising authors and three keynote author sessions. (Tulane University)

From Tulane University

The New Orleans Book Festival at Tulane University announced today the daily lineups of more than 100 celebrated and rising authors for its inaugural weekend, March 19-21 on Tulane University’s Uptown campus. Continue reading »

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Feb 052020
 

Sarah Broom won the National Book Award for “The Yellow House,” a memoir about her family’s history in New Orleans. (via Tulane University)

By Emily Carmichael, Uptown Messenger

Writer Sarah Broom is from New Orleans, but not the part of New Orleans where she spoke on Tuesday (Feb. 4), the famed, oak-lined streets of Uptown. She’s from a yellow house on Wilson Avenue in New Orleans East.

Her experience in that house — and what it says about New Orleans, the United States, and our relationship to our environment — is the subject of her debut book “The Yellow House: A Memoir.” It won the 2019 National Book Award for nonfiction. Continue reading »

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Feb 052020
 

The literary career of New Orleans native Anne Rice spans 40-plus years and features 30 novels with more than 100 million copies sold. (Thias Scheer, via Tulane University)

By Roger Dunaway, Tulane University

Tulane University’s Howard-Tilton Memorial Library has acquired the complete archives of famed best-selling New Orleans author Anne Rice, thanks to a gift from Stuart Rose and the Stuart Rose Family Foundation.

Born and raised in New Orleans — the setting of her most famous books — Rice is the author of 30 novels with more than 100 million copies sold, placing her among the most popular authors in recent American history. Rice’s work has included gothic and erotic fiction, as well as Christian literature, but she is best known for her novels in vampire and supernatural fiction. Continue reading »

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Jan 292020
 

Sarah M. Broom’s “The Yellow House,” a memoir of her family’s history in New Orleans, won the National Book Award for nonfiction. (via Tulane University)

By Barri Bronston, Tulane University

Sarah M. Broom, a New Orleans native and winner of the 2019 National Book Award, will speak Tuesday, Feb. 4, at Tulane University as part of the “American Water and Actual Air” speaker series, which focuses on interpreting the environment across academic disciplines. Continue reading »

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Jan 222020
 

Management at The Boot supports the new police substation.

By Emily Carmichael, Uptown Messenger

Tulane University has won city approval to build a Tulane University Police Department substation on the previous site of the Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity building across from The Boot Bar and Grill.

The now vacant lot at 1036 Broadway is zoned as residential and required a conditional use approval to be used in a public works and safety capacity.

As Uptown Messenger previously reported, the station will be a single story, 3,600-square-foot building to serve as a 24/7 command center for TUPD’s off-campus patrols. Continue reading »

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Jan 182020
 

By Christian Willbern, Loyola University New Orleans

College and other patrons packed Bruno’s Tavern on Maple Street. (via Bruno Tavern’s Facebook Page)

As the LSU Tigers paraded down Victory Hill on Saturday, Uptown restaurant and stores still basked in the influx of cash from Monday night’s football game. LSU’s national championship win against Clemson gave a boost to the local economy, especially to businesses that kept the drinks coming.

“Keep in mind that all the Baton Rouge kids are all driving down here. We got a 50% increase in sales just on Monday alone,” said Broadway Food Store manager Kal Ghalbatar. “It was crazy.”

“Probably 80% of our customers were not regular customers. Most of them were from Baton Rouge or out of state,” he continued. “Although it was hectic, the people coming in were the best, especially the Tigers fans.” Continue reading »

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Jan 082020
 

(via newcombartmuseum.tulane.edu)

In New Orleans during the late 19th and early 20th century, a form of artistic expression emerged. It emphasized improvisation and individual expression, and it gave voice to talented individuals whose voices had traditionally been repressed.

It’s not what you may think. As well as jazz music, that description can apply to Newcomb pottery.

A permanent display of Newcomb products in the new Commons building on Tulane’s Uptown campus now makes them more accessible to the general public as well as students. Continue reading »

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