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Nov 152019
 

YAYA Inc. will host their annual Just Say YAYA gala tonight (Nov. 15) to help support tuition-free arts and entrepreneurship training programs for local youth. The gala takes place from 6 to 10 p.m. at the YAYA Arts Center at 3322 LaSalle St. They will celebrate “ARTrepreneurs” and career development to benefit creative young people. Continue reading »

Nov 092019
 

King Ester, directed by Dui Jarrod, is the story of a black trans woman in Uptown New Orleans on the week prior to Hurricane Katrina. (via kingester.com)

The New Orleans Film Festival turned 30 this year, and their diversity in films and filmmakers is a point that they stress. This year, they screened “232 visionary, thought-provoking films that represent a wealth of perspectives,” 26% of which were Louisiana-made and 56% directed by people of color. One series based in Uptown New Orleans made its debut on the NOFF big screen and online simultaneously.

“King Ester”—directed by Dui Jarrod and presented by Issa Rae’s ColorCreative production company—takes the viewer into the world of a black trans woman right before natural disaster.  Continue reading »

Nov 052019
 

The annual Propeller Pop! fundraising event, featuring popup restaurants and more, returns this Wednesday, Nov. 6. (Propeller Pop! 2018 by Claire Bangser)

According to Propeller: A Force For Social Innovation, the nonprofit has accelerated over 215 entrepreneurs since 2011, and their ventures have created more than 485 jobs and generated over $112 million in revenue and financing.

Propeller will host its annual gala and celebrate social entrepreneurs and innovation in New Orleans this Wednesday, Nov. 6. Continue reading »

Nov 042019
 
Crescent City Creative Carnial 2018

C4 is an all-day event for creatives of all types to learn, network, and have fun. The second annual event takes place at the New Orleans Jazz Market on Saturday, Nov. 9. (courtesy of Crescent City Creative)

One’s social network can influence important decisions like who they ask for business advice, where they shop and how they listen to music. For professionals in the arts, that network could dictate their standard of living, job consistency or perceived professional value.

On Saturday, one couple will bring together creative business owners, branding strategists, entertainers and more to share industry insights and grow their networks together.

Crescent City Creative Carnival logo

via Crescent City Creative

Crescent City Creative is a nonprofit creative agency based in New Orleans and founded by husband and wife Willard Hill and Quan Lateef-Hill, who want the city’s talent to thrive more.

“We really see New Orleans as this cultural epicenter that is often overlooked as people focus in on New York, L.A., Atlanta and coastal cities,” said Lateef-Hill, a filmmaker and producer. Continue reading »

Nov 012019
 

via GNOHA

The #PutHousingFirst march and rally is an effort by the Greater New Orleans Housing Alliance and Home by Hand to spread awareness about the city’s need for affordable housing. Advocates and neighbors will march through Central City with The Hot 8 Brass Band starting at 10:30 a.m., and a rally will immediately follow. Continue reading »

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Oct 262019
 

Self portrait of photographer Arthur P. BedouXavier University of Louisiana, in partnership with The Louisiana Creole Research Association, will celebrate the opening of “Picturing Creole New Orleans: The Photography of Arthur P. Bedou” on Saturday, Oct. 26.

The exhibition is part of LA Creole’s 15th annual conference, and it will feature collected photographs by the heralded New Orleans native who was personal photographer to Booker T. Washington.

“The purpose of the conference is to showcase Creole life in New Orleans in the early 20th century through the lens of Mr. Bedou,” conference organizers said. Continue reading »

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Oct 212019
 

How Audubon Charter School Nurtures
My Two Very Different Children

By Donishia S. Dorsey

In the fifth of our ten-essay series by parents of students at public schools Uptown, Donishia Dorsey writes about her children’s experience at Audubon Charter School Uptown. Like New Orleans as a whole, Uptown has many public school options for families—from college preparatory schools, to three different language immersion programs, to a Montessori program, to a technology career pathway school. In this series, we hear from parents themselves on why their child’s school is right for them.

My two children, Jackson and Chloe, are very different from one another. Chloe is in fifth grade, and she has a personality that doesn’t fit in a single room. She wants to be president someday. Jackson is is in  Pre-K 4. He’s younger than Chloe and still learning about himself. He’s quieter and loves puzzles. 

I was nervous that a single school could not nurture both of my children’s different strengths or meet their different needs, but Audubon Charter School Uptown does just that. Continue reading »

Oct 182019
 
Spy Bow Dow by Carl Harrison, Jr.

Spy Boy Dow Edwards is the subject of director Carl Harrison Jr.’s latest film, premiering at New Orleans Film Festival tonight. (via NOFF)

Dow Michael Edwards — a lawyer from Uptown New Orleans who grew up loving the Black Masking Indian culture — is headed for a big screen debut in the short film “Spy Boy Dow.” The film directed by Carl Harrison Jr. follows Edwards’ suit-making process in preparation for Mardi Gras Day.

This is Harrison’s second project to be accepted into the New Orleans Film Festival in three years, and it premieres at The Broad Theater tonight (Oct. 18).

The birth of Spy Boy Dow

“The Spy Boy is first in the front… he is ahead looking for trouble. Only a chosen few can be Spy Boy. It’s his job to send a signal to First Flag when he sees other Indians. First Flag signals back down the line to Big Chief. Big Chief has a stick that controls the Indians. When he hits the ground with the stick, they better get down and bow to the Chief.” – the late Big Chief Larry Bannock of Gert Town’s Golden Star Hunters, (via mardigrasneworleans.com)

Edwards is a partner at the Irwin, Fritchie, Urquhart & Moore law firm, and spy boy for the Mohawk Hunters Mardi Gras Indian tribe. His interest was sparked as a child when watching Indians with his family on Mardi Gras Day. He admired the tradition and culture from afar until he found a way in. Continue reading »

Oct 162019
 

“The Long Shadow” directed by Daniel Lafrentz (via NOFF)

The New Orleans Film Society kicks off the 30th New Orleans Film Festival at tonight (Oct. 16) with the Opening Night Film Marriage Story. Uptown’s Prytania Theater will screen over a dozen films, including Motherless Brooklyn, directed by and starring Edward Norton, and The Long Shadow, by Louisiana director Daniel Lafrentz. Shorts from the state and big-budget films are some festival highlights coming to the neighborhood this year.

Of the 6,500 submissions from 104 countries, 232 “visionary, thought-provoking films that represent a wealth of perspectives” made it into the festival. 50% of the films were made in the American South, and 26% are Louisiana-made.

“The festival’s strong accent on Southern voices is a vote of confidence in the rich storytelling in this region,” said New Orleans Film Society’s Artistic Director Clint Bowie in a statement to the press.

via NOFF

Continue reading »

Oct 072019
 

“The Teachers Are My Favorite Part”: Why Our Family Loves Samuel J. Green Charter School

By Antonio and Revonda Darensbourg

In the fourth of our ten-essay series by parents of students at public schools Uptown, Antonio and Revonda Darensbourg write about their children’s experience at Samuel J. Green Charter School. Uptown, like New Orleans as a whole, has many public school options for families—from college preparatory schools, to three different language immersion programs, to a Montessori program, to a technology career pathway school. In this series, we hear from parents themselves on why their child’s school is right for them.

In 2012, we sent our first child, Antonio, to school at Samuel J. Green Charter School. The first day naturally brought tears, both from him and from us, as we parted ways for the day. But when he came home that afternoon, Antonio was excited and happy. The next day, he was looking forward to going back. We said to each other, “Okay, we’re going to keep him here as long as we can.” Continue reading »

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Oct 032019
 

Art students from Young Audiences Charter School will paint collaborative pieces live with Brandan “BMIKE” Odums and other professional New Orleans artists this Saturday, Oct. 5, at Urban South Brewery. YALA Art Live, a fundraiser for Young Audiences of Louisiana, will feature live painting, artist popups, a DJ and food truck. Continue reading »

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Oct 012019
 
Sonya Brown of NOLA Vegan Café

Sonya Brown, chef at NOLA Vegan Café, at work in her kitchen. (Tyree Worthy, UptownMessenger.com)

At the corner of Leonidas and Spruce sits the Community Commitment Education Center, a public space for neighborhood engagement, summer programs for children, and now a plant-based restaurant. Formerly Stella’s Coffee House, the kitchen space at 1923 Leonidas St. is now officially home to NOLA Vegan Café, which opens today, Oct. 1.

The café is the work of Uptown’s Sonya Brown, a social worker and chef known for her vegan popups. Earlier this year, she met Nicole Bouie, CEO and director of the center, who also has a social work background. Continue reading »

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Sep 152019
 

Sponsored by Korman Gerrity Real Estate

I’m Joe Gerrity, local businessman, investor and Real Estate Broker. For my monthly “Yo Joe!” column, I’ll be answering your real estate questions as well as providing market information and housing statistics.

I believe the main responsibilities of a Realtor are to add value and facilitate mutually beneficial transactions, and through this column I hope to help the New Orleans community make more informed decisions about their housing future.

Yo Joe! It’s been a while. What’s going on?

Yes, it has. Honestly, I’ve been taking on a lot more than I’m used to, and writing this fell by the wayside. I’m formally bringing on a few partners who I’ve been working with for a while,  and together we’re rebranding the brokerage. I launched a New Orleans-based CBD manufacturing company, Crescent Canna, which is now on shelves all over the city. 

Also, I’m still a child at heart so I have a hard time doing anything that can even be conceived of as “school” work during summer vacation…

With that said, I’m handing this edition off to William “Buddy” King, who is the Senior Realtor at Korman Gerrity. He’s been working locally with buyers and sellers for over five years after spending time as a New Orleans teacher. Buddy is without a doubt one of the most professional and competent realtors I’ve ever had the pleasure of working with.

Continue reading »

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Aug 302019
 

Dryades Public Market, 2017. (photo by Ashlin Washington)

Dryades Public Market has been a favorite space of mine for years. The news of its closing, reported by NOLA.com, was unexpected, and a bit saddening. I’ve spent many lunchtimes in the mezzanine space with my laptop in front of me and a deli sandwich on the side. Chef Allison was almost always there to greet me when the hot food bar opened for lunch and the first batch of mac-and-cheese made its presence known.

The managers were gracious, open and willing to try different ways to serve quality food options to its neighbors. I’ve hosted several events and planning meetings there. Its interior architecture — beams, brick, and the built-in schoolhouse vibe — make me appreciate the effort as much as the space.

With this bad news also comes room for imagination, I think. Here are some wild ideas for the former grocery store space. Mind you: I haven’t the funds to make any of these dreams come true, and I also understand that reality. Continue reading »

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