Robert Morris

Sep 132014
 
The Young Leadership Council's panel at Rising Tide 9 at Xavier University on Saturday morning. (Robert Morris, UptownMessenger.com)

The Young Leadership Council’s panel at Rising Tide 9 at Xavier University on Saturday morning. (Robert Morris, UptownMessenger.com)

The Rising Tide “Conference on the Future of New Orleans” takes place today (Saturday, Sept. 13), with panels on the “lost historical memory” of New Orleans, organizing in marginalized communities, government waste at the Treme Center, religion in the city and a keynote address by Dr. Andre Perry.

See below for live coverage.

Live Blog “Lost Historical Memory” panel at Rising Tide

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Sep 122014
 

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Andre Perry (via drandreperry.com)

Andre Perry (via drandreperry.com)

The annual Rising Tide “Conference on the Future of New Orleans” will host educator Dr. Andre Perry as its keynote speaker, with panel discussions on the lost histories of New Orleans’ Palmer Park, community organizing, government waste and finding religion in the city, as well as “tech school” sessions on using social media in publishing. Continue reading »

Sep 112014
 
The front door of the Priestley school building in west Carrollton. (Robert Morris, UptownMessenger.com)

The front door of the Priestley school building in west Carrollton. (Robert Morris, UptownMessenger.com)

The Orleans Parish School Board property committee recommended that Lycee Francais be approved to purchase the former Priestley campus Thursday, sending the proposal to the full school board next week for what could be final approval. Continue reading »

Sep 112014
 

(image via NOPD)

(image via NOPD)

Andre Williams (via opcso.org)

Andre Williams (via opcso.org)

Police have arrested a man in connection with the carjacking of two men who were lured to a dark Hollygrove street late last month with the promise of a date from a woman met online, though they now question whether the “woman” had anything to do with the case at all, New Orleans police said. Continue reading »

Sep 092014
 
Retired Lt. Gen. Russell Honore (center) and other advocates discuss contamination in the soil at the former Booker T. Washington site in front of what remains of the former school. (Robert Morris, UptownMessenger.com)

Retired Lt. Gen. Russell Honore (center) and other advocates discuss contamination in the soil at the former Booker T. Washington site in front of what remains of the former school. (Robert Morris, UptownMessenger.com)

When Lt. Gen. Russell Honore led 20,000 federal troops into the city of New Orleans for search-and-rescue missions in the aftermath of the collapse of the federal levees following Hurricane Katrina, he instructed his soldiers not to let the contaminated water touch them.

Nine years later, Honore said, the risk of pollution to New Orleanians is coming not from the failures of the federal government, but from decisions made by leaders right here in the city and state — such as the plan to rebuild Booker T. Washington High School in Central City on top of heavily contaminated soil at the old Clio Street dump. State documents show that in some locations, cancer-causing compounds are present in levels more than 100 times what is considered acceptable.

“As we worked nine years ago to help save this city, we’re going to work now to help save this city from itself,” Honore said. “Because you know what? It’s not the White House doing this. It’s not President Bush doing this. It’s the leaders in New Orleans doing this, and it’s people we did not put in the office — the RSD.”

Many alumni of Booker T. Washington, however, believe that the Recovery School District’s plan for treating the contamination is sufficient, that Honore’s concerns are an unnecessary excess of caution, and that it is time to move the long-delayed construction of a state-of-the-art school forward. Continue reading »

Sep 092014
 
An undated photo of the basketball court at Evans Playground on LaSalle Street. (via Kaboom.org)

An undated photo of the basketball court at Evans Playground on LaSalle Street. (via Kaboom.org)

As Freret residents continue to organize an “official” booster club that would make Evans Playground eligible to host city-sponsored events such as free Movies in the Park and organized sports, they are hoping to attract support and sponsorships from the businesses on the commercial corridor. Continue reading »

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Sep 092014
 
Surveillance image from the third armed robbery, Monday, Sept. 8. (via NOPD)

Surveillance image from the third armed robbery, Monday, Sept. 8. (via NOPD)

(map via NOPD)

(map via NOPD)

After three armed robberies within as many weeks on the same auto-parts store, New Orleans police are now looking for the heavily disguised “serial robber” believed to be responsible for all three brazen mid-afternoon attacks, authorities said. Continue reading »

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Sep 062014
 
A group of "football wives of New Orleans" enjoys drinks on a back porch prior to the game. (Robert Morris, UptownMessenger.com)

A group of “football wives of New Orleans” enjoys drinks on a back porch prior to the game. (Robert Morris, UptownMessenger.com)

Tulane fans pass Yulman Stadium, seen from Calhoun Street. (Robert Morris, UptownMessenger.com)

Tulane fans pass Yulman Stadium, seen from Calhoun Street. (Robert Morris, UptownMessenger.com)

Long before Yulman Stadium even received its name, questions of how football games would impact the neighborhoods around Tulane University dominated discussions about the return of college football to the Uptown campus.

On Saturday, those questions were finally answered: On-street parking may have been tough to find, but traffic was relatively light, and many neighbors were thrilled to revive the front-yard parties associated with memories of the old Sugar Bowl stadium.

“Going to the Dome spoiled my football experience at Tulane. I’m so glad, 40 years later, that we’re back, and I’m shocked at how quiet Audubon Boulevard is,” said Seph Dupuy, a 1970 Tulane graduate as he attended a small gathering there. “I’m pleasantly surprised how well controlled and easy it is to get around.” Continue reading »

Sep 052014
 
820 General Pershing Street, photographed in December 2012. (UptownMessenger.com file photo)

820 General Pershing Street, photographed in December 2012. (UptownMessenger.com file photo)

LaToya Cantrell

LaToya Cantrell

Stacy Head

Stacy Head

In early 2013 — barely a month after she was sworn into office — City Councilwoman LaToya Cantrell issued a statement forcefully proclaiming her opposition to the demolition of a century-old house at 820 General Pershing that was essential to the “the residential fabric of the community,” she said.

On Thursday — citing an impasse that fellow Councilmember Stacy Head described as a more of a “hostage” situation — Cantrell voted to approve the demolition of the same property. Cantrell declined to explain the reason for her change of heart, but residents who met with her extensively leading up to the decision said it may have to do with concerns about the viability of the city’s overall process for denying the demolition of historic properties. Continue reading »

Sep 042014
 
820 General Pershing Street, photographed in December 2012. (UptownMessenger.com file photo)

820 General Pershing Street, photographed in December 2012. (UptownMessenger.com file photo)

After nearly two years of opposition by neighbors and repeated rejections from city officials, the demolition of a century-old home on General Pershing just off Magazine Street was approved Thursday by the New Orleans City Council. Continue reading »