Apr 222014
 
The Coliseum Square fountain flows in the background during a crawfish boil fundraiser in May 2012. (photo courtesy of Jim McAlister)

The Coliseum Square fountain flows in the background during a crawfish boil fundraiser in May 2012. (photo courtesy of Jim McAlister)

(image via neworleansfilmsociety.org)

(image via neworleansfilmsociety.org)

Two of the Crescent City’s best springtime offerings — the Coliseum Square Association’s annual crawfish boil fundraiser and a showing of “The Goonies” in the New Orleans Film Society’s Moonlight Movies series — will converge on the same evening in an unexpected but possibly perfect pairing next month.

At the last Coliseum Square crawfish boil in 2012, attendance dramatically exceed expectations. About 200 people attended — drawing a number of “new faces” from around the neighborhood — eating 500 pounds of crawfish and drinking several kegs of beer donated by neighborhood bars. The net proceeds after expenses were around $3,000, enough money to pay for all the repairs needed at the time for the park’s fountain, which the association maintains without any assistance from the city.

Meanwhile, the New Orleans Film Society has this spring relaunched its series of outdoor movies projected onto a 25-foot screen — formerly known as “Movies to Geaux,” the result of a 2012 fundraising campaign — as “Moonlight Movies” at locations around the city, including the City Park sculpture garden, site in the Marigny, and Coliseum Square.

When Coliseum Square learned that Moonlight Movies was planning a return to the neighborhood right around crawfish boil time, they all decided to combine the two events together. On May 17, the crawfish boil will begin at 3 p.m. and run until around 7 p.m., and the “The Goonies” will begin around 7:30 p.m., said organizer Lauren Averill at the association’s monthly meeting on Monday.

This year, crawfish will be $10 per plate, or three plates for $20, Averill said, and as usual, the proceeds will go to continue upkeep on the park and the fountain. Watching the movie, however, is free.

So, what exactly makes “The Goonies” such a great fit for a crawfish boil?

“It’s surprising they didn’t have crawfish in the movie,” Averill said.

(The New Orleans Film Society also plans one other Uptown event in the “Moonlight Movies” series, a May 10 showing of the French animated film “The Triplets of Belleville” at the Latter Branch Library at 5120 St. Charles Avenue.)

Association members discussed a few other issues of note Monday:

  • The Spanish-American Baptist Church is now seeking funding from its denomination to create architectural plans to recreate its building at 1824 Sophie Wright Place, which it has repeatedly sought for demolition, Coliseum Square Association president Jim McAlister said the pastor told him in a recent meeting. Once they have the plans, the church will seek to tear down the building and replace it, McAlister said, drawing skepticism from association members who have opposed the demolition.
  • Trinity Episcopal Church is planning a flower garden on Josephine Street for students at its school, McAlister said.
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  • Kunal Nayee

    Did you give the day of this event?? I see dates for other events but only times for this one??

    • UptownMessenger

      It’s in the blue flyer image that says “The Goonies.” But you’re right, I should have repeated it in the text as well.
      Thanks, and hope to see you there.

  • Euggie Monad

    Tearing down the Spanish American Baptist Church building should not be an option, period. Demolition by neglect should not be rewarded. It may be a church, but it has been a terrible neighbor and a horribly irresponsible property owner. If it can’t afford to fix it — and obviously it can’t — then they should sell it. Pressure from the City needs to be brought to bear in this case. Enough is enough. There are PLENTY of investors and contractors who would snap it up in a heartbeat and be happy to renovate it for some sort of adaptive re-use. That building belongs to the community as much as it does to that stupid church. Does it need to burn down for people to do something?