Dec 162013
 

Egyptologist Nicholas Piccardo will speak this evening (Monday, Dec. 16) at Tulane University on “Life in an Ancient Egyptian Elite Household,” then head to Baton Rouge for a discussion of digital archaeology on Tuesday, as part of a double-header of lectures through a new collaboration between the Louisiana Art and Science Museum and the American Research Center in Egypt, New Orleans Interest Group.

For details, see the invitations to both events below:

Monday, December 16, 6:00-7:30 PM

Living to Work / Working to Live: Life in an Ancient Egyptian Elite Household

Nicholas Picardo (Harvard University)

Ever wonder how the other half lived in ancient times? While well-to-do ancient Egyptians lived in houses that must have seemed luxurious and palatial in comparison to what the average person could afford, they used household space for more than just eating, socializing, and sleeping. In ancient times, elite houses were also places to conduct business.

Join us as Nicholas Picardo (Harvard University) discusses his work in the ancient settlement of Wah-sut at Abydos, Egypt, focusing on details of everyday life and administration in this ancient version of a “company town,” circa 1800 BCE. This talk will present the archaeology of a household of the late Middle Kingdom—an era best described as an early example of “Big Government”—from the perspective of the generations who resided in “House E” of Wah-sut.

Dinwiddie Hall 305, Tulane University, New Orleans

Sponsored by the American Research Center in Egypt, New Orleans Area Interest group, this event is free to the public. Seating is limited and on a first-come basis.

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Tuesday, December 17, 5:30-7:30 PM

Visualizing Ancient Egypt at Giza: The Merger of Science and Art in Digital Archaeology

Nicholas Picardo (Harvard University)

Join us on a virtual walk through the ancient pyramids at Giza. This exciting presentation explores new applications of 3D graphic reconstruction currently being undertaken by The Giza Project at Harvard. From the royal pyramid complexes and mastaba tombs to the landscape of the Giza Plateau itself, cutting-edge graphic modeling based on over a century’s worth of excavation records is enhancing modern understanding of this ancient site.

Adalié Brent Auditorium, Louisiana Art and Science Museum, Baton Rouge

This presentation is offered by the Louisiana Art and Science Museum and the American Research Center in Egypt, New Orleans Area Interest Group. Admission is free.

For more information, visit www.arce-nola.org/events

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