Jun 282013
 

(map via NOPD)

A man and a woman sitting on the front porch of a home in the Garden District were robbed at gunpoint late Thursday evening, authorities said.

The victims, both in their 30s, were sitting on the porch of a home in the 1200 block of Eighth Street around 11 p.m. Thursday when three men opened the gate, according to the initial report. One of the robbers was holding a chrome or silver handgun, and the trio said very little to the victims, just gesturing toward their belongings, said Lt. Frank Young of the NOPD Sixth District investigation unit.

The woman gave up her purse and the man gave his wallet and iPhone, and the suspects then left, the report states. Police were able to track the iPhone into the 1900 block of Toledano before losing the signal, Young said.

Anyone with information should call the Sixth District at 658-6060 or CrimeStoppers at 822-1111.

[Note: This article was first published at 11:02 a.m. Friday and updated at 1:02 p.m. with additional details obtained at the NOPD weekly Comstat meeting.]

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  • traveler

    OK, I understand being scared or in shock but why did they see the three men coming and not go inside the house? Why didnt the robbers care to go inside? Did the woman have her purse outside with her? She didnt go inside to grab it? I know when Im sitting on my porch at night I have a glass of wine and possibly my cell phone. This sounds like a really awkward robbery. Glad everyone is safe.

    • Concerned

      Hi. Woman with the purse here. The guys hid behind a shrub that obstructs the view of the street. Clearly, we would have gone inside had we any idea they were approaching us. And I’m not sure what is “awkward” about what happened. We were just two people minding our own business on our own porch who suddenly had a gun in our faces. Pretty straight forward. And I’m not sure why they didn’t go inside. I didn’t think it was an appropriate question for me to ask the men who were mugging me. Did I mention the gun in our faces?

      Perhaps be more careful with your wording in the future. It certainly sounds as if you are blaming the wrong parties.

      • traveler

        Thank you very much for responding. Knowing that they hid in the bushes is EXTREMELY informative. I am very, very sorry for what happened to you. This can be a scary city and in order to stick together we need to be informed. I get frustrated with a lack of information in articles I read, not the victims. I just live in the neighborhood and want to know what the hell is going on. Also, Im happy they didnt come inside your house and there would be no reason for you to ask them “why?” but I have to admit that it is surprising. I dont need to bother you with those things though. Just know that I was only asking questions from the newspaper to know exactly what happened and not accusing you, the victim, of being negligent.

        • Concerned

          Thank you, traveler. I’m sorry I took your comments the wrong way. We were just totally taken by surprise, and are obviously feeling very sensitive today. If you ever want to talk and hear the entire story, please stop by our block. Thanks for your concern, neighbor! Please be safe.

        • Concerned

          And honestly, they were kids. They seemed to be as frightened as we were. I’m assuming that is why they didn’t ask to come inside. Not that being young is an excuse, but it certainly speaks to the problems with New Orleans society. Again, I apologize for taking your comments in the wrong way.

      • Linda Cornish Rioux

        I so agree with you.. and so sorry this happened to you, but relieved you were not physically harmed .

  • Joanne Hilton

    So much for the “Garden District Patrol.” Totally useless – last Saturday night we caught three guys breaking into our car on the corner of Coliseum and 1st (we were also on our front porch); when we yelled they ran away, and when we called the patrol (for which we pay more millage than we do for community libraries) all of the cars came to our house, instead of looking for the suspects. We had to TELL them to leave us and go .look, before the perps did it again. Totally useless. Just a honeypot for those that “run ” the patrol. They get around a million dollars a year in our property tax money for this “protection.”.

    • Ken Davis

      Joanne,

      I am really sorry that you do not seem to understand what the patrol can and cannot do, similar to what NOPD can and cannot do.

      If you think, by using the term “honeypot,” that members of the security district board are illegitimately spending taxes, I suggest that you present some evidence rather than inuendo.

      Board member are volunteers and are paid nothing for their efforts. Most of the money ultimately goes to the men and women on the street in the cars patroling.

      If you have ideas on how this money can be better spent, present them to the Board. If you have a complaint on how any specific incident was handled, you can call the GDSD office and register your disatisfaction.

      That would accomplish more than posting misinformation on forums such as this. Even a little bit of investigation would tell you that this year’s budget anticipates collecting $724,212 in taxes and other revenue.

      • Joanne Hilton

        I was referring to paid personnel of the security district, not unpaid volunteer board members, and the issue is whether or not taxpayers are getting their money’s worth. I HAVE, in the past, attended the annual meeting, which I might add is very poorly advertised. I think some investigation on your part might reveal that other security districts have smaller administration costs while covering much larger geographic areas.

        That is, however, ancillary to the fact that the patrol is not doing a very good job, as evidenced by recent events. By the way, the day that the young woman on 8th Street was abducted and raped, I just so happened to have been in the Walgreen’s parking lot at about the same time. There were at least two patrol cars parked in the lot. That is frequently the case, I might add.

        While I always appreciate the work of volunteers, as I have over the years logged in many volunteer hours myself for myriad causes, I would like to suggest that the all-volunteer board of this “security district” take a careful look at the large bank balance (from over-collection in past years) and make a plan for it to be returned to the taxpayers by way of a much smaller millage.

        Since I have your ear, I would like to strongly suggest that the board move toward and All-NOPD detail. In my 23 years on this corner, I have found them to be so, so much more effective. Perhaps that move would also cut down on administrative costs, which could then be put into patrols.

  • Moses

    It use to be sitting on the porch was an idyllic experience. Nowadays, it is a front row experience to a reality show, where you are the victim. Perhaps porches should be outfitted with a little turrets – what a terrible thought.

  • MOLLY

    Geeeeezzzzz!!!!!!! You’re Not Safe Nowhere In NOLA; Smh!!

  • Uptowner

    Another reason to own a gun/have a concealed carry… The libs on here don’t want to hear that but its so true.

    • Njnhno

      They should own a gun so the headline could read: “Five Shot in Violent Attempted Robbery”???

      • Owen Courrèges

        Njnhno,

        It’s impossible to say how these types of crimes will ultimately go down, but personally, I’d rather not be at the mercy of criminals. You’ll recall that there was a murder very near my home recently where the victim was robbed, tied up and then shot in the head. If thieves come by, I don’t know if they’re the kind who are going to take the loot and go, or the type to tie me up and shoot me.

        There’s a risk of making the situation worse, sure, but I think most people would prefer that risk to the alternative of leaving their lives in the hands of the criminal.

        • will_k2

          We know how this situation went down, because the victim posted above. The perps – nervous kids – emerged from behind a bush with weapon drawn. You’re reaching for your concealed-carry weapon at that point? Good luck with all that Owen, I’ll look forward to the new Uptown Messenger columnist.

          • Owen Courrèges

            will,

            Good situational awareness only goes so far, true, but a well-trained person might have been able to respond. Without actually seeing what happened play-by-play I couldn’t say, but the idea that an armed victim can’t thwart an armed perpetrator (even one already holding a gun) simply isn’t true.

          • will_k2

            Yeah, I have seen those Bruce Willis movies too. I just don’t think they’re real.

    • seeemeeego

      Beginning 1 July, Mississippi law goes into effect that allows gun owners to openly carry their firearms in public without a gun permit. People can make all the jokes they want about the Magnolia State, but I bet nobody will get robbed while enjoying their front porch.

      • Yet another Uptwon resident

        So after July 1, no one in Mississippi will get robbed on their front porch. You read it here first folks!

      • leo Seymour

        Some of that law is still under review…check out the sunherald.com

        However, one law that’s gotten lots of attention the past few weeks has been put on hold. Hinds County Circuit Judge Winston Kidd issued an injunction Friday to block a law that would let people openly carry guns in many public places. Kidd is scheduled to hear more arguments July 8 about whether to extend his injunction.

        The chief sponsor of the gun law, Republican Rep. Andy Gipson of Braxton, said it simply restates a right guaranteed in Section 12 of the Mississippi Constitution. He said some people mistakenly believed they couldn’t carry a visible gun without a permit. A state-issued permit is still needed to carry a concealed weapon, and lawmakers this year said information about concealed-carry permit holders is no longer a matter of public record

        Read more here: http://www.sunherald.com/2013/06/29/4768563/new-mississippi-laws-cover-wide.html#storylink=cpy

    • lauraburlton

      So….every time you go out on your porch you gonna be holding your gun in one hand and your beer in another? What if you want to check your phone,smoke a cigarette or just enjoy a conversation without worrying about your gun? In order for them not to take you unaware, you would probably need to have been holding the gun at the ready, like a paranoid crazy…not enjoying yourself on the front porch. Might as well stay in the back yard

      • Owen Courrèges

        laura,

        There’s nothing that off about having a gun on the porch with you. Although there’s always a risk somebody will sneak up on you, many criminals are less circumspect. Of course, it comes down to what people are comfortable with — there’s no moral imperative to be armed on your own porch, and it’s frankly regrettable that crime would make one’s own porch seem unsafe.

        • disqus_fu9vmrCPnp

          A gun is a great equalizer, as long as you are also aware of your surroundings.
          But IMO…while sitting on ones front porch, you just can’t beat having a big dog laying next to you. They are always aware of theirs and my surroundings.

      • Uptowner

        They do make small guns with pocket holsters… That’s my daily carry. My job requires me to travel to places like Nola East sometimes so getting it was almost necessary for me. You can laugh and call me paranoid but at least I’ll be somewhat prepared rather than another easy target

  • Jackie Martello

    The Garden District Patrol isn’t doing a very good job at all in my opinion. Unfortunately, I also think the “Raintree Services” inadvertently brings violent crime into 1200 block of Eighth Street and the surrounding neighborhood.

    • ClioLife

      The Raintree sounds like a wonderful organization! Maybe if more people had this growing up they wouldn’t be robbing people on their porches! This is a bigger problem than a well meaning nonprofit on your block, that you’ve decided to blame. It’s a culture of growing up without an education and or in poverty….. That’s only a tiny part of it. Raintree, if you’re listening I think there is a petty rich person who wants you off the block. No more do-gooding while they’re around. You’re bringing around the filth for them to see…

      • Jackie Martello

        Raintree is a good organization and I support it wholeheartedly- on your street. I guess it is easy for people like you to be anonymously sanctimonious when the kidnapping and rape that happened Feb 5th or the armed robbery June 27th isn’t happening to your neighbors or friends.

  • Darrell Kocha

    Apparently the Garden District has become a big ATM for the criminal class in New Orleans.

    • Joanne Hilton

      And one of the biggest “ATMs” in the Garden District is the honeypot of taxes we pay for “protection .”

  • Guest

    The link below is a map for crimes that happened in NOLA from 6/23/13 to 6/29/13. Other than the north golf course of City Park I can’t find and area that I would regard as “safe”. You can never predict how you’ll react in such a situation, and judging another’s reaction is inconsiderate. You’ll never know what you’ll do when staring at a gun barrel in your face. I’m 56 and I’ve lived in NOLA for 46 year of those years. I’m always on guard, but the “element of surprise” is the perpetrator’s advantage. There’s only so much any of us can do. Both times I was in Paris I was accosted. Yes, beautiful Paris, France. Regardless of where I am in the world I’m always grateful for my “training” in NOLA.

    http://www.crimemapping.com/map.aspx?loc=new+orleans

    • Fumer Tue

      The Parisians like to advertise that their city is safe but it is simply not the case. Ask the Chinese, who carry huge amounts of cash, and are often robbed. I would take New Orleans over Paris any day, even in terms of beauty. Mostly, New Orleanians are so much nicer!

  • Lenora Hess White

    Okay, okay, okay…. I hear all of y’all and I’m balancing the options. I work nights at Stein Mart on Tchop. I get outta there at 9:35 – 9:50 at night and walk to the streetcar with my pepper spray in hand — a gift from a friend. This does not bother me… I’m a street smart kid. Rats… street smart senior citizen. What bothers me is that at lunch on Saturday, I set my iphone down for 3 seconds to pay for lunch at the deli on Tchop and it was hijacked… Anonymous perp ran out the door. Mucho distressing….

    • Linda Cornish Rioux

      note to self.. don’t lay down anything that could be stolen.. put it in your pocket, backpack, leave it in your locked car.. whatever.. Sorry , but that’s NOLA. Pepper spray is a good idea , my fellow senior citizen !

  • Barry Obama

    As a former resident of NOLA, in the salad days of the seventies and periodically since then, I have to say that looking at it from the outside these days, one gets the impression of an age cohort of out of control youthful thugs rampaging uptown and elsewhere.

    Funny I cant remember ever being concerned about that back in the early seventies.but then I was naieve.and the bars stayed open till 4 am and I was on the move.

    Personally I think a nice pump action shotgun with a shortened stock laying across ones lap as they rocked on the porch would be useful.

    Then again I’m a Leftist who believes in giving as good as I get!